Understanding Hate

Throughout this archive that I have so far written, I have possibly, through connotation, indicated that one should favor love over hate. Thus, it would be easy to interpret my writings as indicating that there is no reason for hate. This statement is certainly untrue, however, and additionally, love and hate are not mutually exclusion, but, instead, hate is a subset of the more encompassing idea of love.

We often associate hate with violence, but that is only a specific formulation of hate within a restricted context. A large portion of our shallow understanding of emotions has to do with the idea of gossip and negotiating measures of security. What goes on inside one’s mind is only of interest to philosophers and psychiatrists, as it is today, in our modern habitat.

I believe that one may be surprised by what goes on in the mind’s of others, despite there being little obvious evidence indicating anything at all, aside from some psychological studies. What one does notice, is what happens overtly, acting outside of the range of what would be qualified as solely mental activity.

Before we learn language, lessons, and advice, we act emotionally natural. This is an obvious conclusion based on the definition of natural behavior. As we learn, we face the turmoil of abandoning our innate emotional systems, in favor of a sociological one — one that can own your soul and pay rewards.

Throughout my writings, I have advised that we reconnect with our inner emotions and thoughts (often in the language we dream in), understand them, and keep them alive and well. These emotional systems are what compose our psyche and intelligence, and if one were to reduce and divide the system down far enough, one would see that all actions and thoughts are truly occurring due to a fascination and excitement toward life. (The complex actions of sapience, that humans so often take a superficial pride in claiming, are really a result of a long and winding accumulation of much more basic behavior, not unlike the cognitive behavior of animals. Sapience is really just a more complex sentience, and the core of action still rests in sentience. Sapience, in a way, is a superficial concept, regarding only a configuration of life that results in pronounced wisdom and reflection, and it is, also, a characteristic which humans only moderately possess.)

One of the important emotions of the psyche is hate. The most common example of the utility of hate occurs in the friendly conversation with a stranger. This is also a reflection of the story, written the Qur’an, of when Satan (then Iblis) was cast from Heaven.

Upon meeting a friendly stranger, it is typical to pronounce a jovial greeting, and to continue with some conversation. This joviality, which is born of a considerate and kind intention, can lead to problems further in the conversation. The reason for this, is the conversation is initiated by mutually acknowledging the power of the notion of “yes.” However, as this notion of “yes” evolves, it eventually commits an error. That is, in parallel to the Qur’an, it does not respect or serve the person, anymore. It then takes on a more evil quality, hindering honest conversation.

Many people have experienced this pattern. Some learn ways of emphasizing “no,” but this is unavailable to a large portion of extraordinarily kind and intellectual people. To these people, if there is no logical justification for initiating a negative or counterpoint attitude, then that attitude will not manifest.

The problem here is the lesson that hate is what we always avoid. There is an implication, heard around the world, that hate is a useless and unwanted emotion. This couldn’t be further from the truth (being literally the antipole of the actuality).

One problem with considering hate as useless and unwanted, is that people will repress it to a maximal extent, and this can be exacerbated by an achievement-oriented attitude, but leads to a periodic need to relieve oneself, which is often moderately explosive, or at least quite pronounced.

In finding a state of true happiness, we are also looking for a type of consistency and stability — a reliability of personal well-being. If we are encountering a repression–explosion pattern of psychological behavior, we must adjust something, and that usually is a re-appraisal of how one cares for one’s complex state. It usually involves accepting an emotion that was being repressed or shunned.

In this case, we are focusing on the emotion of hate. If we can understand hate and appreciate and take care of this emotion, then instead of there being more hate, there will actually be less hate. The alternative, which results in a repression–explosion pattern of dis-regulated and misunderstood emotion is more likely to result in an overtly hateful action, and has a greater chance to become fallibly directed, due to the haste that is represented in this explosion pattern, resulting from inconsiderate self-repression and a desperation to return to psychological regularity and honesty. (Essentially, the systems which need to express hate do not collaborate properly with the systems that were shunning it, so the resulting expression is only partially informed.)

Returning to our example of a polite encounter with a stranger, there is a pattern that one should be aware of. This happens internally and naturally, but can be repressed or overridden by a learned pattern of cultivating only “yes,” (cultivating only Iblis, in my interpretation). The problem with cultivating only Iblis, is that when Iblis disobeys you (and purportedly God, as he desired Iblis to serve Adam, but Iblis refused), he turns into evil, and his name becomes Satan, the tempter of Hell.

One can notice when this happens. Firstly, one perceives things as going well — introductions are quite easy as they’re very predictable, and the beginning conversation has no prior ideas to refer to, so it is quite free. However, after things become a little more complex, a striking sensation appears. Sudden awkwardness and an inability to fluidly speak satisfying words starts to appear. The conversation becomes mechanical and less enjoyable. While many will resort to an overbearing performance attitude (in an attempt to lead a floundering conversation), the interpersonal connection and understanding has already become shallow and tedious, regardless. Without both sides remaining psychologically within a zone of comfort, the conversation cannot become meaningful.

What is happening here is the initial affirmative and positive attitude, which works so well for introductions, starts to lead the person astray. No longer is it accurately reflecting real-time emotions, and it becomes less representative of the person. It is because of this that one must learn to accept hate, often interpreted as “no,” although it is more specific than the idea of “no.”

As soon as one feels hate, one should accept it. The social language portion of the mind frequently does not represent the emotions of the self with a satisfying degree of accuracy. If one believes in love, friendship, and positivity — all generally welcome directions of a person — that positivity can result in one ignoring internal disagreement. Our society focuses largely on social language constructions, and largely ignores the internal emotional systems, as they do not communicate in social language, but instead, in terms of emotional intuition. Not infrequently, the socially communicated ideas override the more natural internal and quiet dialog of emotional systems. This can cause a type of internal hindrance and a resulting instability, as truths of the self are ignored, leading to a false understanding of oneself.

The solution, however, is simple. It is to understand hate, and accept it in an aware and cognizant way. Hate really only becomes overt when it is ignored for a long time. If one accepts the hate they feel when an as the individual feels it, then the body’s emotional intelligence can better facilitate self-care. Why would we hate? Well, the answer is reflected in the Qur’anic story of when Iblis was sent away from Heaven, to become Satan, tempter of Hell and Damnation. The power of “yes,” suddenly betrays the person, and becomes evil, leading to torment if one continues to follow the pattern of “yes,” which worked prior.

When the idea of “yes” betrays the person who has chosen to convey and cultivate it, the person feels hate, as a natural and healthy response. At this point, the person is faced with two decisions. One is to repress and deny the feeling (which can lead to an internal desperation to eventually express it), and the other option is to accept the hate, feel the hate, and realize its benefit. If one does not accept the hate, then they have fallen prey to Satan, as Iblis turns into Satan when “yes” fails the individual. If one accepts the hate, as it is hate for becoming damned into a state of psychological insecurity and agony, so it is hate towards an unwanted eventuality, then one avoids the temptation to fall into a state of brokenness.

Being aware of one’s natural hate and understanding its purpose, benefit, and reasoning, allows one to secure oneself against any instance of a temptation of evil, which leads to an undesirable circumstance.

The example I gave, of a conversation with a stranger, is definitely not the only instance when positivity and good intention lead one to discomfort and insecurity. If one is tolerant of someone, and denies the hate the tolerant individual feels, then slowly the pain, which would be avoided by accepting the internal hate, becomes greater and greater, and leads one to an unstable state of being, perhaps eventually breaking down in some way. It is more advisable that one, instead, accepts the hate, understanding that it’s not really against the person, but against the possible damages that can occur if one accepts a fallible notion as an integrated component of one’s being. Hate pushes things away, and evil influences affect a person in an unhealthy way. By recognizing and accepting the hate that one naturally feels, the psyche (and possibly body as well, considering the connection of the health of the mind and the health of the body) can better protect itself against harmful thought patterns that can manifest in the mind as a result of an uncomfortable and undesirable influence.

In conclusion, the principle feeling of hate — hate at its very instantiation and core — is a psychological mechanism of security. If an evil influence seeks to alter a person in an unwanted way, hate is the natural innate and internal reaction. This hate is a communication from within one’s collaboration of intelligent inter-dependent systems, communicating to other associated systems, so that the mind and body can remember to push certain ideas away, so they will not inflict damage or harm unto the person.

Understanding some of the fundamental emotions, we may remember that happiness indicates an increase, or at least, a sustaining, of a pattern of behavior, while sadness indicates to slow something down, evaluate, connect, and seek understanding, to remedy a potentially harmful action. Hate is a defensive emotion, designed to shield one from becoming influenced. Upon the receipt of an evil influence, hate is communicated so that the systems of the mind and body do not become affected by the influence, and can continue with stability, comfort, and the security of a nicely functioning mind.

Evil, and subsequent sin, is a powerful force, and one should take on the attitude that it can occur from literally anyone during any interaction. Such influences often last for mere seconds or less, and are interspersed throughout most conversations. The body is a dynamic system of a collaboration of emotional systems, and as such, various emotions can be simultaneously experienced and accepted, resulting in a dynamic and complex experience. (This is opposed to the notion that one should experience only one emotion at a time, which is antithetical to a distributed system of intelligence, as I purport the mind to be.)

Hate is closely related to anger and is largely synonymous. The only difference is the context in which it is commonly used. One is often perceived as having hate, while regarding anger, one is perceived as performing an action, although these distinctions are largely cultural and certainly not canon. Therefore, what applies to hate, also applies to anger, and it is helpful to understand these two ideas as the same idea.

Therefore, intelligently and with awareness, one should feel one’s internally expressed hate, agree with it, take care of the systems that have communicated the message, and continue living, feeling, and expressing, in a comparatively more honest and natural way than in what the denying and shunning the feelings of hate (and anger) would result. With this, there is less of a need to ever express anger, because there is no repression that steadily increases in urgency of recognition. Ultimately, one will find much more peace than following a philosophy of the eradication of the emotion of hate.

Internal honesty is vital to a healthy and comfortable mind. Is it self-antagonism that often leads to distress. Recovering from many years of beating oneself up can take some time, but with a desire to accept and understand oneself, there is great promise. Additionally, if one understand’s oneself, then one is able to understand others. Otherwise, it is a bit of an absurdity to think one can understand another person if one does not accept and understand his or her true and honest self.

One final note, is to remember that the internal language is based on an efficient and highly responsive system of intuitively understood emotional messages. It is far more accurate and efficient than high-level invented language. This also means that, like dreams, its interpretation may be misleading. Try to focus on what you truly feel, as opposed to what words or images are coming to mind. The association of internal emotion with misrepresentation can lead to conflict as well. It is important to remember that the more overt ideas of our invented language(s) may range from slightly misrepresenting internal intuition, to completely misrepresenting internal intuition. This also applies to people with brain injury, where there are likely some misrepresentations. Our brains weren’t designed to trace our invented language, but were instead evolved with a direction towards inspiration, guided by deep and meaningful emotions (emotions that inspire action and change). The infinitude of emotions are the honest language of our modern soul.